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The recent changes in healthcare coverage options – officially known as the Affordable Care Act (or ACA) – make health insurance easier to get and more affordable for many people with HIV. Barriers have been removed that may have kept you from being able to get coverage in the past because of your HIV status.

You can no longer be denied coverage or charged more because of your HIV status or any other health condition (known as pre-existing conditions). Insurers also can’t limit how much they’ll spend on your medical care, whether over a year or over a lifetime. And some new standard benefits may be helpful for your HIV care and treatment.

If you are not offered health insurance through your or a family member’s job, you now have some new options available. Depending on your income and your state, you may be able to get covered through Medicaid. If you don’t qualify for Medicaid, you can buy your own coverage through new online Health insurance marketplaces (also called exchanges).

Under the new law, states can choose to expand Medicaid to cover more people. Depending on whether your state has chosen to expand Medicaid, you may now be eligible even if you were not before. If your state has expanded Medicaid and you earn about $16,000 a year or less as a single person (or $21,000 or less as couple), you likely can get coverage under the program at no or little cost to you. Also, in the states that have expanded Medicaid, you no longer need an AIDS diagnosis or need to be very sick or disabled to qualify. Not all states are expanding Medicaid; if yours is not, you should still check requirements to see if you can get coverage from the program. Click here to find out whether your state has expanded Medicaid.

If you don’t qualify for Medicaid, you can buy your own coverage in online health insurance marketplaces that are now offered in every state. All plans sold through the marketplace must provide a minimum set of benefits – called Essential Health Benefits (EHB). These benefits may be helpful to your ongoing HIV care, like prescription drugs, doctor visits, hospital care and mental health care and certain preventive services.

By filling out a single application either online or in person, you can find out if you qualify for Medicaid or, if you need to buy your own coverage, compare different plans and their costs. You cannot be denied coverage or charged more because of your HIV status.

If you are buying your own coverage in the marketplace, financial assistance may be available to reduce how much you pay each month for your coverage (your premium) and also what you pay out of your own pocket when you seek medical care. In general, financial help is available through the marketplace if you don’t have another source of coverage and you earn between $11,490 and $46,680 as a single person (income ranges vary depending on your family size).

For marketplace coverage beginning January 1, 2015, you must apply during the open enrollment period that runs from November 15, 2014 through February 15, 2015. You may also qualify for a special enrollment period outside of the open enrollment period if you experience certain events, which are called qualifying life events. Qualifying life events include moving to another state, certain changes in your income and changes in your family size, including marriage, divorce or having a baby. If you are eligible for Medicaid or CHIP, you can enroll any time of year.

If you have questions or need help enrolling in coverage, go to www.HealthCare.gov. You’ll find information about your options and resources to help you understand what you need to do. And you can find out where to get help in person from a navigator or patient assistor, a trained person who can help you learn about new ACA coverage options. Click here and type in your ZIP code to find out what organizations in your area can provide in-person help.

Most Americans are required to have health insurance or pay a fine if they don’t.
You may be eligible to receive additional services or financial support from the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, including a part of Ryan White called the AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP). Ryan White and ADAP are programs specifically for people with HIV. They don’t qualify as insurance, so you still need to acquire insurance coverage. Financial assistance may be available to help you pay to purchase new coverage in the marketplace, or for other expenses, such as HIV services that your health plan does not cover.

To find out about the health insurance marketplace, including financial aid, and Medicaid coverage options in your state, click here>>.

A NOTE ABOUT CITIZENSHIP: To be eligible for health coverage in the health insurance marketplace, you must be a U.S. citizen or a legal resident of the United States. To be eligible for Medicaid, you must satisfy federal and state requirements regarding residency and immigration status and provide documentation of U.S. citizenship. You do not need to be a U.S. citizen to get assistance through the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program or ADAP.

If you are currently receiving Medicaid, you don’t need to do anything unless your circumstances change, aside from going through the usual redetermination process.

Medicaid is the nation’s health insurance program for people with lower incomes, including many people with HIV. Eligibility for Medicaid is based on having a low income (qualifying income levels vary by state) and some states require you to fall into a specific category of eligible people, which varies by state. Some states limit Medicaid coverage for adults to certain groups including parents of dependent children and people with health conditions serious enough earn them classification as disabled. Many people with HIV qualify as disabled if they have been diagnosed with AIDS.

As part of the Affordable Care Act, states can choose to expand Medicaid to cover more people based on income alone. If you live in one of the states expanding this program, this means you may now be eligible for Medicaid even if you were not before. If you live in a state that has expanded Medicaid and you earn about $16,000 a year or less as a single person (or $21,000 or less as couple), you likely can get coverage under the program. Also, you no longer need an AIDS diagnosis or to be very sick or disabled to qualify for coverage under these expanded programs.

In states that haven’t expanded Medicaid, coverage will continue to be available under the same rules as before the enactment of the Affordable Care Act.

If your circumstances have changed and you no longer receive Medicaid – or don’t expect to next year – you will want to explore other options for healthcare coverage. Many people get health insurance through their own or a family member’s job. If that is not an option, you can buy your own coverage in Health insurance marketplaces now offered in every state.

All plans sold through the marketplace must provide a minimum set of benefits – called Essential Health Benefits (EHB). These include benefits that may be helpful to your ongoing HIV care, such as prescription drugs, doctor visits, hospital care and mental health care and certain preventive services.

To find out about your options in the marketplace, you can fill out an application either online or in person to learn about different plans and their costs. You cannot be denied coverage or charged more because of your HIV status.

If you are buying your own coverage in the marketplace, financial assistance may be available to reduce how much you pay each month for your coverage (called your premium), and what you pay out of your own pocket when you seek medical care. In general, you may be eligible for financial help in the marketplace if you have no other source of coverage and you earn between $11,490 and $46,680 as a single person (income ranges vary depending on your family size).

For marketplace coverage in 2015, you must apply during an open enrollment period that runs from November 15, 2014 through February 15, 2015. You may also qualify for a special enrollment period outside of the open enrollment period if you experience certain events, which are called qualifying life events. Qualifying life events include moving to another state, certain changes in your income and changes in your family size, including marriage, divorce or having a baby. If you are eligible for Medicaid, you can enroll any time of year.

If you have questions or need help enrolling in coverage, go to www.HealthCare.gov. You’ll find information about your options and resources to help you understand what you need to do. And you can find out where to get help in person from a navigator or patient assistor, a trained person who can help you learn about new ACA coverage options. Click here and type in your ZIP code to find out what organizations in your area can provide in-person help.

Most Americans are required to have health insurance starting in 2014 or pay a fine if they don’t.

You may be eligible to receive additional services or financial support from the Ryan White The Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, including a part of Ryan White called the AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP). Ryan White and ADAP are programs specifically for people with HIV. These programs don’t qualify as insurance, so you still need to acquire insurance coverage. Financial assistance may be available to help you pay to purchase coverage in the marketplace, or for other expenses, such as HIV services that your health plan does not cover.

To find out about the health insurance marketplace, including financial aid, and Medicaid coverage options in your state, click here>>.

A NOTE ABOUT CITIZENSHIP: To be eligible for health coverage in the health insurance marketplace, you must be a U.S. citizen or a legal resident of the United States. To be eligible for Medicaid, you need to satisfy federal and state requirements regarding residency and immigration status and, in most cases, provide documentation of U.S. citizenship. You do not need to be a U.S. citizen to get assistance through the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program or ADAP.

Medicare is the nation’s health insurance program for people 65 and older and for younger people with disabilities, including people with HIV. If you are currently on Medicare, you don’t need to do anything, although you may see some added benefits from the Affordable Care Act.

Your hospital, physician and other medical bills will continue to be paid through Medicare. As before, you have the option to choose between traditional Medicare and a Medicare Advantage plan (such as a Medicare HMO or PPO) offered in your area. If you are on traditional Medicare, you may also continue to choose among different Medicare prescription drug plans offered in your area. If you want additional coverage to supplement traditional Medicare, you also may be able to buy a Medigap supplemental insurance policy. The open enrollment period for people currently on Medicare runs from October 15-December 7, 2014, and is likely to be the same in 2015. People with Medicare coverage can call 1-800-MEDICARE or visit the Medicare website for plan information.

If you will soon become newly eligible for Medicare because of age, you can sign up during a seven-month period that starts three months before the month you turn 65 and ends three months afterwards. If you are under 65 and disabled, you can sign up for Medicare during the seven-month period that starts three months before your 25th month of getting benefits and ends three months after your 25th month of getting benefits. Call 1-800-MEDICARE or visit the Medicare website for more details.

If you are under 65 and disabled, you can sign up for Medicare during the seven-month period that starts three months before your 25th month of getting disability benefits and ends three months after your 25th month of getting disability benefits. Call 1-800-MEDICARE or visit the Medicare website for more details.

You may have heard about new online Health insurance marketplaces (also known as exchanges) set up in every state to make it easier for people to buy health insurance. These marketplaces are not for people on Medicare; in fact, it is against the law for a company to sell a marketplace plan to you if they know you have Medicare coverage.

The Affordable Care Act has made some significant improvements to Medicare’s benefits that are of interest to people with HIV:

  • Prescription drugs will be more affordable for Medicare beneficiaries.
  • You will no longer have to pay a fee for an annual checkup from your doctor.
  • You will no longer be charged a fee for many preventive screenings for cancer, depression, diabetes, cholesterol, obesity and other conditions.

If you have a low income and modest assets, you may qualify for extra help with Medicare’s premiums and cost sharing requirements, under the Medicare Savings Program, and for additional benefits, such as dental and long-term services and support, under Medicaid, which
For more information about Medicare, visit www.medicare.gov or call the 1-800-MEDICARE help line.

A NOTE ABOUT CITIZENSHIP: To be eligible for Medicare, you must be a U.S. citizen or a permanent legal resident of the United States for at least five years. You do not need to be a U.S. citizen to get assistance through the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program or ADAP.

If you are currently receiving support for your HIV care and treatment from the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program or the AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) you will still be required to have health insurance (if you are eligible).

The Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, and the AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP) provide services and financial assistance for care and treatment of people with HIV. Ryan White and ADAP help people with HIV who cannot get affordable health insurance pay for healthcare services. These programs also help boost other coverage, whether private insurance, job-related insurance, Medicaid or Medicare, by covering services not covered by insurance and assisting with copays and cost sharing.

The programs will continue to be available to those that remain uninsured and are ineligible for coverage. It will fill in any gaps in coverage for those that gain new sources of insurance. For example, if you gain insurance coverage but do not have access to case management, Ryan White can continue to provide that service. If you are not offered health insurance through your own or a family member’s job, you now have new options for coverage. The Affordable Care Act (or ACA) makes health insurance easier to get and more affordable for many people with HIV. It also removes barriers that may have kept you from being able to get coverage in the past because of your HIV status.

You can no longer be denied coverage or charged more because of HIV or any other health condition (known as pre-existing conditions). Insurers also can’t limit how much they’ll spend on your medical care – over a year or over a lifetime. There are also some new standard benefits that may be helpful for your HIV care and treatment.

Depending on your income and state, you may be able to get covered through Medicaid. If you don’t qualify for Medicaid, you can now buy your own coverage through new online Health insurance marketplaces (also called exchanges).

Under the Affordable Care Act, states can choose to expand Medicaid to cover more people, which means you may now be eligible for Medicaid even if you were not before. If you live in a state that has expanded Medicaid and you earn about $16,000 a year or less as a single person (or $21,000 or less as couple), you likely can get coverage under the program. Also, in states that have expanded Medicaid, you no longer need an AIDS diagnosis or to be very sick or disabled to qualify. Not all states are expanding Medicaid, but even if yours is not, you should still check requirements to see if you can get coverage from the program.

If you don’t qualify for Medicaid, you can buy your own coverage in online health insurance marketplaces that are now offered in every state. All plans sold through the marketplace must provide a minimum set of benefits – called Essential Health Benefits (EHB). These include benefits that may be helpful to your ongoing HIV care, like prescription drugs, doctor visits, hospital care and mental health care and certain preventive services.

By filling out an application online or in person you can find out if you qualify for Medicaid. If you need to buy your own coverage, you can compare different plans and their costs. You cannot be denied coverage or charged more because of your HIV status.

If you are buying your own coverage in the marketplace, financial assistance may be available to reduce how much you pay each month for your premium, and what you pay out of your own pocket for medical care. You may be eligible for financial help in the marketplace if you don’t have another source of coverage and you earn between $11,490 and $46,680 as a single person (income ranges vary depending on your family size).

For marketplace coverage in 2015, you must apply during an open enrollment period that runs from November 15, 2014 through February 15, 2015. You may qualify for a special enrollment period outside of the open enrollment period if you experience certain events, which are called qualifying life events. Qualifying life events include moving to another state, certain changes in your income and changes in your family size, including marriage, divorce or having a baby. If you are eligible for Medicaid, you can enroll any time of year.

If you have questions or need help enrolling in coverage, go to www.HealthCare.gov. You’ll find information about your options and resources to help you understand what you need to do. And you can find out where to get help in person from a navigator or patient assistor, a trained person who can help you learn about new ACA coverage options. Click here and type in your ZIP code to find out what organizations in your area can provide in-person help.

Starting in 2014, most Americans are required to have health insurance or pay a fine if they don’t.

If you are currently receiving support for your HIV care and treatment from the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, and the AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP), you will still need to get health coverage if you are eligible. If Ryan White assists you with copays or premiums to help make your coverage affordable, it may still be able to continue to help you in this way. It may also be able to help provide you with HIV services that your new insurance does not cover. Check with your Ryan White service provider to see if this assistance is still available to you.

To find out about the health insurance marketplace, including financial aid, and Medicaid coverage options in your state, click here>>.

NOTE ABOUT CITIZENSHIP: To be eligible for health coverage in the health insurance marketplace, you must be a U.S. citizen or a foreign national living legally in the United States. To be eligible for Medicaid, you need to satisfy federal and state requirements regarding residency and immigration status and, in most cases, provide documentation of U.S. citizenship. You do not need to be a U.S. citizen to get assistance through the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program or ADAP.

If you currently get health insurance from your own or a family member’s job and do not expect that to change next year, you don’t need to do anything. You likely won’t see any significant change to your benefits.

If your circumstances change – or you are not satisfied with the coverage you have or feel you are paying too much – you can buy your own coverage from online Health insurance marketplaces (also known as exchanges) set up in each state. These exchanges generally make it easier to buy insurance on your own. Be careful, however, before you take this step, as buying your own insurance may be more expensive. If you choose to give up insurance available through your employer, you may be giving up your employer’s contribution to the cost, and you may not be eligible for financial assistance from the government.

For you to qualify for financial assistance from the government to purchase insurance on an exchange, your employer-based coverage must fail to meet a certain standard under the law. In those cases, depending on how much you make, financial assistance could be available to reduce how much you pay each month for your coverage (called your premium) and for medical costs paid from your own pocket. You may be eligible for financial help in the marketplace if you earn between $11,490 and $46,680 as a single person (income ranges vary depending on your family size). All plans sold through the marketplace must provide a minimum set of benefits – called Essential Health Benefits (EHB). These include benefits that may be helpful to your ongoing HIV care, like prescription drugs, doctor visits, hospital care and mental health care, as well as certain preventative services.

By filling out a single application online or in person, you can find out about different plans and their costs if you are buying your own coverage. If you lose your job in the future or your income is low and you have no other source of coverage, you can also find out through this process if you qualify for Medicaid. You cannot be denied coverage or charged more because of your HIV status.

For marketplace coverage in 2015, you must apply during an open enrollment period that runs from November 15, 2014 through February 15, 2015. You may also qualify for a special enrollment period outside of the open enrollment period if you experience certain events, which are called qualifying life events. Qualifying life events include moving to another state, certain changes in your income and changes in your family size, including marriage, divorce or having a baby. If you are eligible for Medicaid, you can enroll any time of year.

If you have questions or need help enrolling in coverage, go to www.HealthCare.gov. You’ll find information about your options and resources to help you understand what you need to do. And you can find out where to get help in person from a navigator or patient assistor, a trained person who can help you learn about new ACA coverage options. Click here and type in your ZIP code to find out what organizations in your area can provide in-person help.

Starting in 2014, most Americans are required to have health insurance or pay a fine if they don’t.

You may be eligible to receive additional services or financial support from the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, including a part of Ryan White called the AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP). Ryan White and ADAP are programs specifically for people with HIV. These programs don’t qualify as insurance, so you still need to acquire insurance coverage. Financial assistance may be available to help you pay to purchase coverage in the marketplace, or for other expenses, such as HIV services that your health plan does not cover.

To find out about the health insurance marketplace, including financial aid, and Medicaid coverage options in your state, click here>>.

NOTE ABOUT CITIZENSHIP: To be eligible for health coverage in the health insurance marketplace, you must be a U.S. citizen or a foreign national living legally in the United States. To be eligible for Medicaid, you need to satisfy federal and state requirements regarding residency and immigration status and, in most cases, provide documentation of U.S. citizenship. You do not need to be a U.S. citizen to get assistance through the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program or ADAP.

If you currently buy your own health insurance (not through an employer or Medicaid or Medicare), you have new options for coverage that may cost less and provide more benefits than your current plan.

The Affordable Care Act (or ACA) makes health insurance easier to get and more affordable for many people with HIV. It also removes barriers that may have kept you from being able to get coverage in the past because of your HIV status.

You can no longer be denied coverage or charged more because of HIV or any other health condition (known as pre-existing conditions). Insurers also can’t limit how much they’ll spend on your medical care – over a year or over a lifetime. There are also some new standard benefits that may be helpful for your HIV care and treatment.

Depending on your income and state, you may be able to get covered through Medicaid. If you don’t qualify for Medicaid, you can now buy your own coverage through new online Health insurance marketplaces (also called exchanges).

Under the Affordable Care Act, states can choose to expand Medicaid to cover more people, which means that you may now be eligible for Medicaid even if you were not before. If you live in a state that has expanded Medicaid and you earn about $16,000 a year or less as a single person (or $21,000 or less as couple), you likely can get coverage under the program. Also, in states that have expanded Medicaid, you no longer need an AIDS diagnosis or to be very sick or disabled to qualify. Not all states are expanding Medicaid, but even if yours is not, you should still check requirements to see if you can get coverage from the program.

If you don’t qualify for Medicaid, you can buy your own coverage in online health insurance marketplaces that are now offered in every state. All plans sold through the marketplace must provide a minimum set of benefits – called Essential Health Benefits (EHB). These include benefits that may be helpful to your ongoing HIV care, like prescription drugs, doctor visits, hospital care and mental health care and certain preventive services.

By filling out an application online or in person you can find out if you qualify for Medicaid. If you need to buy your own coverage, you can compare different plans and their costs. You cannot be denied coverage or charged more because of your HIV status.

If you are buying your own coverage in the marketplace, financial assistance may be available to reduce how much you pay each month for your premium, and what you pay out of your own pocket for medical care. You may be eligible for financial help in the marketplace if you don’t have another source of coverage and you earn between $11,490 and $46,680 as a single person (income ranges vary depending on your family size).

For marketplace coverage in 2015, you must apply during an open enrollment period that runs from November 15, 2014 through February 15, 2015. You may qualify for a special enrollment period outside of the open enrollment period if you experience certain events, which are called qualifying life events. Qualifying life events include moving to another state, certain changes in your income and changes in your family size, including marriage, divorce or having a baby. If you are eligible for Medicaid, you can enroll any time of year.

If you have questions or need help enrolling in coverage, go to www.HealthCare.gov. You’ll find information about your options and resources to help you understand what you need to do. And you can find out where to get help in person from a navigator or patient assistorr, a trained person who can help you learn about new ACA coverage options. Click here and type in your ZIP code to find out what organizations in your area can provide in-person help.

Starting in 2014, most Americans are required to have health insurance or pay a fine if they don’t.

If you are currently receiving support for your HIV care and treatment from the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, and the AIDS Drug Assistance Program (ADAP), you will still need to get health coverage if you are eligible. If Ryan White assists you with copays or premiums to help make your coverage affordable, it may still be able to continue to help you in this way. It may also be able to help provide you with HIV services that your new insurance does not cover. Check with your Ryan White service provider to see if this assistance is still available to you.

To find out about the health insurance marketplace, including financial aid, and Medicaid coverage options in your state, click here>>.

NOTE ABOUT CITIZENSHIP: To be eligible for health coverage in the health insurance marketplace, you must be a U.S. citizen or a foreign national living legally in the United States. To be eligible for Medicaid, you need to satisfy federal and state requirements regarding residency and immigration status and, in most cases, provide documentation of U.S. citizenship. You do not need to be a U.S. citizen to get assistance through the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program or ADAP.

The Affordable Care Act (or ACA) makes health insurance easier to get and more affordable for many people with HIV. It removes barriers that may have limited your healthcare options or made it harder to get care in the past because of your HIV status. As part of the ACA, most Americans are required to have health insurance or pay a fine if they don’t. Your insurance must be one of the following to qualify as coverage under the ACA:

  • Medicaid
  • Medicare
  • A private insurance plan
  • An employer plan (including COBRA)
  • The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP)
  • TRICARE (for current service members and military retirees, their families, and survivors)
  • Veterans healthcare programs, including the Veterans Health Care Program, VA Civilian Health and Medical Program (CHAMPVA) and the Spina Bifida Health Care Benefits Program
  • Peace Corps Volunteer plans

The following do not qualify as insurance if they are your only source of coverage:

  • The Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program, including a part of Ryan White called the AIDS Drug Assistance Program
  • Coverage only for vision care or dental care
  • Workers’ compensation
  • Coverage only for a specific disease or condition
  • Plans that offer only discounts on medical services

If you only receive Ryan White or one of the other unqualified programs listed above you will need to obtain insurance coverage, if you are eligible. You can learn more about what programs are available to you, including financial help if you need it, by visiting your state page>>

If you have coverage through TRICARE or the VA, you are generally considered covered and do not need to make any changes.

If you’re a veteran without VA health care, visit the VA healthcare website. You may learn that you qualify for VA coverage.

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) operates several health care programs for veterans. The specific veterans’ programs that meet the ACA’s requirement for coverage are the Veteran’s Health Care Program, the VA Civilian Health and Medical Program (CHAMPVA), and the Spina Bifida Health Care Benefits program.

If you are a veteran who isn’t enrolled in VA benefits or other health coverage, you can get coverage from online Health insurance marketplaces (also known as exchanges). These are programs set up in each state to make it easier to buy insurance on your own. Even if you are covered by the VA, you may be able to obtain coverage from an insurance marketplace that lowers your monthly premiums or reduces your out-of-pocket costs (depending on your family size and income). Also, if you are a veteran who receives health care from the VA but has dependents that are not eligible for VA programs, note that they are required to have insurance and may purchase coverage through a marketplace.

All plans sold through the marketplace must provide a minimum set of benefits – called Essential Health Benefits (EHB). These include benefits that may be helpful to your ongoing HIV care, like prescription drugs, doctor visits, hospital care and mental health care and certain preventive services.

Depending on how much you make, financial assistance to buy your own coverage in the marketplace may be available. This can reduce the amount you pay each month for your premium and for medical costs paid from your own pocket.

By filling out an application online or in person, you can compare different plans and their costs if you are buying your own coverage; you can also find out if you qualify for Medicaid if you have a low income and no other source of coverage. You cannot be denied coverage or charged more because of your HIV status. Applying for coverage through the marketplace will allow you to compare costs with your current coverage under the VA or Tricare.

For marketplace coverage in 2015, you must apply during the open enrollment period that runs from November 15, 2014 through February 15, 2015. You may also qualify for a special enrollment period outside of the open enrollment period if you experience certain events, which are called qualifying life events. Qualifying life events include moving to another state, certain changes in your income and changes in your family size, including marriage, divorce or having a baby. If you are eligible for Medicaid, you can enroll any time of year.

If you have questions or need help enrolling in coverage, go to www.HealthCare.gov. You’ll find information about your options and resources to help you understand what you need to do. And you can find out where to get help in person from a navigator or patient assistor, a trained person who can help you learn about new ACA coverage options. Click here and type in your ZIP code to find out what organizations in your area can provide in-person help.

To find out about the health insurance marketplace, including financial aid, and Medicaid coverage options in your state, click here>>.

A NOTE ABOUT CITIZENSHIP: To be eligible for health coverage in the health insurance marketplace, you must be a U.S. citizen or foreign national living legally in the United States. To be eligible for Medicaid, you need to satisfy federal and state requirements regarding residency and immigration status and, in most cases, provide documentation of U.S. citizenship. You do not need to be a U.S. citizen to get assistance through the Ryan White HIV/AIDS Program or ADAP.

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We have made every effort to provide accurate information on this portal, but you should contact the marketplace or Medicaid agency in your state for guidance on your specific situation. Click here to find contacts in your state. All data on the site were updated November 2014 and are subject to change.

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